CBSE Class 12 English Core

CBSE Class 12 English Core
Sample Paper 01 (2020-21)

Maximum Marks: 80
Time Allowed: 3 hours

General Instructions:

  1. This paper is divided into two parts: A and B. All questions are compulsory.
  2. Separate instructions are given with each section and question, wherever necessary. Read these instructions very carefully and follow them.
  3. Do not exceed the prescribed word limit while answering the questions.

  1. Section A
  2. Read the passage:
    Many of us return home after our holidays to brush the sand out of our luggage, water wilted pot plants, and later sort through treasured holiday memories forever. Months after your latest break and those happy snaps, you ask the questions – Where on an e-mail to the relatives? Downloaded onto a compute most of them when they discovered the hard disk was getting too filled with heavy files?
    If your household is like mine, the memories of our 2005 summer holiday may well disappear into the void that lies between the material past. You see, our paper photo album ends halfway through 2004. Since then the arrival of the digital camera and the mobile camera phone has meant our photos are ‘stored’ (on two computers, two phones, the camera itself, in an online di friends). None of the ‘photos’ has made it onto paper and into the album. And they probably never will.
    In fact, techno-challenged people like me fear these new pixel images will never become permanent, and that pictures on screen in albums, whose pages are turned like the books of our lives.
    The processing industry once hoped the snap lead to more images being transferred to paper because some households are yet to adjust to the latest forms of photographic display and storage.
    The most fundamental way photography has changed is that digital photos are virtually free. A happy snapper can take hundreds of photos of an event, rather than ration the occasion to a dozen composed shots. Digital snappers can become like the National Geographic photographers, who take about 12,600 shots per assignment, knowing only ten will be used.
    The photographer, however amateur, also becomes the editor. Once the images are transferred to a computer, they can be tampered with. Don’t like the person in the shot? Get rid of him. Want to make London look sunny? Click on the blue sky. A double chin? Deft shading will fix that.
    The photo, once a candid image and a priceless memory, becomes something that’s cheaply taken, easily discarded, and endlessly manipulated.
    It’s easy to see why the photo processing industry is having trouble coming to terms with the new century of snappers. An industry whose slogan was the preservation of priceless family memories has found itself in a virtually disposable world.
    For more than a century, memories of who we were and where we’ve come from have been refreshed by regularly turning the pages of our photographic chronology. Future generations will have a different grab on their history. A series of mouse clicks will take through a kaleidoscope of images of life caught on the run.
    On the basis of your understanding of the above passage, answer ANY TEN questions from the eleven given below:

    1. Why, in the present times, none of the ‘photos’ makes it to the paper or album?
      1. They are “stored” in electronic devices
      2. They are too many to print
      3. They are too much edited
      4. They have lost their originality
    2. What opinion does the writer have of new pixel images?
      1. They are the future
      2. They will never be permanent memories
      3. They have replaced albums
      4. They can never be seen as a book of memories
    3. What did the processing industry hope after the digital camera became popular?
      1. This would boost their business
      2. More snaps would find a place in albums
      3. It’ll be easy to capture a lot of memories
      4. This is the future of photographic memories
      1. Only A and B
      2. Only B
      3. Only B, C and D
      4. All of these
    4. Why is it said that the digital photos are virtually free?
      1. Not have to worry about the roll count
      2. Can take lots of photos even though a few are to be picked
      3. One may click hundreds of photos and store them digitally
      4. No need to worry about bad clicks
    5. Why does the writer feel that in the present times, photographs have lost their genuineness?
      1. The meaning of candid shots has changed
      2. Every amateur photographer has become an editor
      3. Photos nowadays can be easily manipulated
      4. Photo albums have been taken over by pixel-images
    6. The new- age photos have lost their value because ________.
      1. They are virtually disposable
      2. They no longer preserve priceless memories
      3. They can be captured in large numbers
      4. They tried to replace photo albums
    7. The processing industry is still not happy because ________.
      1. Their businesses are not growing
      2. They find it difficult to adjust
      3. Their business slogan has to be changed
      4. They find people no longer interested in getting albums made
    8. The writer is not impressed with the new-age photos because ________.
      1. They have replaced an era of photo albums
      2. They are merely a kaleidoscope of past life
      3. They are cheaply taken and have lost originality
      4. Pixel images put a heavy load on computer hard-drives
    9. Find a word opposite in meaning to “full” in paragraph 2.
      1. Void
      2. Past
      3. Memories
      4. Arrival
    10. Find a word similar in meaning to “beginner” in paragraph 7.
      1. Tampered
      2. Amateur
      3. Editor
      4. Deft shading
    11. Find a word similar in meaning to “timeline” in paragraph 9.
      1. Memories
      2. Chronology
      3. Generation
      4. Kaleidoscope
  3. Poverty estimation in India
    The percentage of the population living below the poverty line in India decreased to 22% in 2011-12 from 37% in 2004-05, according to data released by the Planning Commission in July 2013. This blog presents data on recent poverty estimates and goes on to provide a brief history of poverty estimation in the country. National and state-wise poverty estimate: The Planning Commission estimates levels of poverty in the country on the basis of consumer expenditure surveys conducted by the National Sample Survey Office (NSSO) of the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation.
    National poverty estimates (% below poverty line) (1993 – 2012)

    Year Rural Urban Total
    1993 – 94 50.1 31.8 45.3
    2004 – 05 41.8 25.7 37.2
    2009 – 10 33.8 20.9 29.8
    2011 – 12 25.7 13.7 21.9

    Source: Press Note on Poverty Estimates, 2011-12
    The current methodology for poverty estimation is based on the recommendations of an Expert Group to Review the Methodology for Estimation of Poverty (Tendulkar Committee) established in 2005. The Committee calculated poverty levels for the year 2004- 05. Poverty levels for subsequent years were calculated on the basis of the same methodology, after adjusting for the difference in prices due to inflation. The table shows national poverty levels for the last twenty years, using the methodology suggested by the Tendulkar Committee. According to these estimates, poverty declined at an average rate of 0.74 percentage points per year between 1993-94 and 2004-05, and at 2.18 percentage points per year between 2004-05 and 2011-12.
    Pre-independence poverty estimates: One of the earliest estimations of poverty was done by Dadabhai Naoroji in his book, ‘Poverty and the Un-British Rule in India’. He formulated a poverty line ranging from ₹ 16 to ₹ 35 per capita per year, based on 1867-68 prices. The poverty line proposed by him was based on the cost of a subsistence diet consisting of ‘rice or flour, dhal, mutton, vegetables, ghee, vegetable oil and salt’. Next, in 1938, the National Planning Committee (NPC) estimated a poverty line ranging from ₹ 15 to ₹ 20 per capita per month. Like the earlier method, the NPC also formulated its poverty line based on ‘a minimum standard of living perspective in which nutritional requirements are implicit’. In 1944, the authors of the ‘Bombay Plan’ (Thakurdas et al 1944) suggested a poverty line of ₹ 75 per capita per year. Post-independence poverty estimates: In 1962, the Planning Commission constituted a working group to estimate poverty nationally, and it formulated separate poverty lines for rural and urban areas – of ₹ 20 and ₹ 25 per capita per year respectively. VM Dandekar and N Rath made the first systematic assessment of poverty in India in 1971, based on the National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1960-61. They argued that the poverty line must be derived from the expenditure that was adequate to provide 2250 calories per day in both rural and urban areas. This generated debate on minimum calorie consumption norms while estimating poverty and variations in these norms based on age and sex.
    On the basis of your understanding of the above passage, answer ANY TEN questions from the eleven given below:

    1. The Planning Commission estimates levels of poverty in the country on the basis of:
      1. surveys conducted by the NSSO
      2. consumer expenditure survey conducted by NSSO
      3. expenditure surveys conducted by NSSO
      4. after adjusting for the difference in prices due to inflation
    2. According to the passage, the percentage of the population living below the poverty line in India has decreased up to ________ from 2004-05 to 2011 -12:
      1. 12%
      2. 15%
      3. 13%
      4. 25%
    3. “Like the earlier method, the NPC also formulated its poverty line…” The earlier method here means:
      1. Method formulated by Tendulkar Committee
      2. Method of conducting a survey of consumer’s expenditure
      3. Method formulated by Dadabhai Naoroji
      4. The method mentioned in the book Bombay Plan
    4. “This generated debate on minimum calorie consumption norms while estimating poverty and variations in these norms based on age and sex.” This here refers to:
      1. A poverty line ranging from ₹ 16 to ₹ 35 per capita per year
      2. A poverty line ranging from ₹ 15 to ₹ 20 per capita per month.
      3. Poverty lines for rural and urban areas – of ₹ 20 and ₹ 25 per capita per year respectively.
      4. Poverty line derived from expenditure that was adequate to provide 2250 calories per day in both rural and urban areas.
    5. Based on the passage, choose the option that correctly demonstrates the poverty estimates for 2009-10:

      1. Image C
      2. Image A
      3. Image B
      4. Image D
    6. Based on the passage, choose the options that list the statements that are TRUE according to the information:
      1. In 1962, the Planning Commission constituted a working group to estimate poverty nationally.
      2. The NPC did not formulate its poverty line based on ‘a minimum standard of living perspective in which nutritional requirements are implicit’.
      3. In 1938, the National Planning Committee (NPC) estimated a poverty line ranging from ₹ 15 to ₹ 20 per capita per month.
      4. VM Dandekar and N Rath made the second systematic assessment of poverty in India in 1971
        1. A and C
        2. B and D
        3. B and C
        4. A and B
    7. Based on the information given in the passage, choose the correct option:
      1. The percentage of the population living below the poverty line in India increased to 37% in 2011-12 from 22% in 2004-05.
      2. The current methodology for poverty estimation is based on the recommendations of Tendulkar Committee.
      3. Poverty declined at an average rate of 2.18 percentage points per year between 1993-94 and 2004-05.
      4. In 1944, the authors of the Bombay Plan (Thakurdas et al 1944) suggested a poverty line of ₹ 100 per capita per year.
    8. Based on the information given in the passage, choose the option that represents an accurate graphic of National Poverty Estimates from 1993 – 2012:

      1. Image A
      2. Image B
      3. Image C
      4. Image D
    9. Which of the following statement is NOT substantiated by any information from the passage?
      1. The NPC based its poverty estimate calculation on Dadabhai Nairoji’s methods.
      2. VM Dandekar and N Rath made the first systematic assessment of poverty in India in 1971, based on the National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1960-61.
      3. In 1962, the Planning Commission formulated separate poverty lines for rural and urban areas – of ₹ 20 and ₹ 25 per capita per year, respectively.
      4. In 1938, the National Planning Committee (NPC) estimated a poverty line ranging from ₹ 15 to ₹ 20 per capita per month.
    10. VM Dandekar and N Rath made the first systematic assessment of poverty in India in 1971, based on:
      1. National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1960-71
      2. National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1960-61
      3. National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1950-61
      4. National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1960-70
    11. Arrange the order poverty estimation in a descending order based on the information given in the table:
      1. 2009–10
      2. 2004–05
      3. 1993–94
      4. 2011–12
        1. A, D, C, B
        2. B, C, A, D
        3. C, A, B, D
        4. C, B, A, D
  4. Read the extracts given below and attempt ANY TWO of the three given by answering the questions that follow. (4+4=8)
    1. Read the extract and answer the following questions:
      Yes, that was a fine fellow you let into the house, said her father. “I only wonder how many silver spoons are left in the cupboard by this time”.

      1. Who is the speaker?
        1. The ironmaster
        2. The blacksmith
        3. Nils Olof
        4. Captain Von Stahle
      2. Who is the speaker speaking to?
        1. Edla Willmansson
        2. The blacksmith
        3. The peddler
        4. Nils Olof
      3. what was the speaker apprehensive of being stolen from his cupboard?
        1. Gold spoons
        2. Silver spoons
        3. A ceramic artefact
        4. A diamond necklace
      4. Who was the fine fellow whom the speaker let into his house?
        1. The peddler
        2. Captain Von Stahle
        3. The clergyman
        4. The blacksmith
    2. Read the extracts given below and attempt the questions that follow:
      They had merely heard that a Mahatma who wanted to help them was in trouble with the authorities. Their spontaneous demonstration, in thousands, around the courthouse was the beginning of their liberation from fear of the British. The officials felt powerless without Gandhi’s cooperation. He helped them regulate the crowd. He was polite and friendly. He was giving them concrete proof that their might, hitherto dreaded and unquestioned, could be challenged by Indians. The government was baffled. The prosecutor requested the judge to postpone the trial. Apparently, the authorities wished to consult their superiors.

      1. The officials felt powerless because:
        1. of Gandhi’s refusal to cooperate with them.
        2. of Gandhi’s polite and friendly behaviour.
        3. the crowd was listening only to Gandhi.
        4. the crowd was getting violent.
      2. The demonstration proved that the:
        1. policies of the British had failed.
        2. dread instilled in the hearts of Indians had begun to lessen.
        3. dealings with the Indian citizens had been unsuccessful.
        4. might of the British had not been understood by Indians.
      3. Which style, from those given below, is being used by the author, when he says, “Apparently, the authorities wished to consult their superiors”?
        1. humourous
        2. dramatic
        3. sarcastic
        4. persuasive
      4. Gandhiji’s behaviour towards the British prior to the proposal of postponement of the trial was that of:
        1. indifference.
        2. calm acceptance.
        3. ignorance of consequences.
        4. polite helpfulness.
    3. Read the given passage and answer the questions that follow:
      Not on my account. I don’t mind who comes into the garden. The gate’s always open. Only you climbed the garden wall.

      1. Who is the author of the lesson, from which this excerpt has been taken?
        1. Susan Hill
        2. Colin Dexter
        3. Jack Finney
        4. John Updike
      2. Who is the speaker of these lines?
        1. Derry’s Mother
        2. Mr. Lamb
        3. Susan Hill
        4. Derry
      3. Who is “You” referred to here?
        1. Susan Hill
        2. Mr. Lamb
        3. Derry’s Mother
        4. Derry
      4. Why “You” have climbed the wall?
        1. He has come there to steal
        2. He doesn’t want to enter through the gate
        3. He is afraid of people
        4. He likes climbing
  5. Read the extracts given below and attempt ANY ONE of the two given by answering the questions that follow. (1×4=4)
    1. Read the extract given below and answer the following questions:
      When Aunt is dead, her terrified hands will lie
      Still ringed with ordeals she was mastered by.
      The tigers in the panel that she made
      Will go on prancing, proud and unafraid.

      1. What is Aunt Jennifer’s death symbolic of?
        1. Her unfulfilled desires
        2. Her suppression
        3. Her weakness
        4. All of these
      2. Explain: ‘terrified hands’.
        1. Hands that shivered out of fear
        2. Hands that shivered due to Parkinson’s disease
        3. Hands that were bruised
        4. Hands that were fractured
      3. What does ‘ringed with ordeals’ imply?
        1. Desire to buy rings
        2. Chained with responsibilities
        3. Trapped underwater
        4. A magical ring
      4. Where did she make the tigers?
        1. In the panel
        2. On her bed
        3. On the sofa cushions
        4. On her gown
    2. Read the extract given below and answer the following questions:
      All lovely tales that we have heard or read;
      An endless fountain of immortal drink.
      Pouring unto us from the heaven’s brink.

      1. Name the poet of the given stanza.
        1. John Keats
        2. Pablo Neruda
        3. Stephen Spender
        4. Robert Frost
      2. What is the thing of beauty mentioned in these lines?
        1. Trees
        2. Tales
        3. Sun
        4. Daffodils
      3. What does the immortal drink provide us with?
        1. Never-ending joy
        2. Everlasting pleasure
        3. Beauty that lasts forever
        4. All of these
      4. What does the word ‘immortal’ mean?
        1. Living forever
        2. Important
        3. Improved
        4. Living briefly
  6. Attempt ANY EIGHT questions from the ten given below. (1×8=8)
    1. How did M. Hamel describe the French language?
      1. It is a dreadful language
      2. It is difficult to learn
      3. It is the most beautiful language in the world
      4. None of these
    2. Why did William dive off a dock at Triggs Island swimming two miles across the lake to Stamp Act Island in the text Deep Water?
      1. He wanted to dive off a dock and swim
      2. He wanted to examine himself
      3. He wanted to go to Stamp Act Island
      4. He wanted to feel the water of the lake
    3. What percentage of the sharecroppers’ property did the landlords compel them to plant? (Indigo)
      1. Ten percent
      2. Twenty-five percent
      3. Fifteen percent
      4. Twenty percent
    4. What was the supreme promise made by the poet Kamala Das to her mother?
      1. That she would appear back
      2. That she would make an illustration of her
      3. That she would memorize her in dreams
      4. That she would miss her a lot
    5. In the period of inactivity, the fishermen would not harm the ________. (keeping quiet)
      1. Whales
      2. Sharks
      3. Frogs
      4. Crocodiles
    6. Which ideologies are generally expressed with opposition in the poems of Adrienne Rich, the poet of Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers?
      1. Liberalism
      2. Feminism
      3. Humanism
      4. Racism and militarism
    7. Who is the author of the prose The Third Level?
      1. Susan Hill
      2. Colin Dexter
      3. Jack Finney
      4. John Updike
    8. “The Face of It” has ________ ending.
      1. emotional
      2. dramatic
      3. apathetic and dramatic
      4. humorous
    9. Who ordered Evans to take off his hat?
      1. Jackson
      2. Stephens
      3. The Governor
      4. None of these
    10. How does Jo react to the skunk story?
      1. Jo does not accept the ending of the story
      2. Jo starts falling for wizard
      3. Jo becomes aggressive
      4. She doesn’t like the story
  7. Section B
  8. You are Sneha F-46, Sec.-9, Rohini, Delhi. You are well qualified in music and dance forms (Classical). You have set up a school for female students. Draft an advertisement to be published in a local daily in about 50 wordsORArts Club of your school is going to organize a drawing and painting competition. Write a notice in not more than 50 words, to be displayed on the school notice board, inviting students to participate in it. Give all the necessary details. You are Rishabh/Ridhima, Secretary, Arts Club, Sunrise Public School, Gurugram, Haryana.
  9. As Secretary of the Literary Club of St Anne’s School, Ahmedabad, draft a formal invitation for all the students in not more than 50 words for the inauguration of the club in your school.ORYou are Mrs. Krishnamurthi. Your son is getting married. You are throwing a party to celebrate the occasion. On behalf of your husband and yourself draft a formal invitation in not more than 50 words inviting friends and relatives to attend the function.
  10. There is a flood of advertisements on television channels these days. Useless commodities and even superstitious beliefs are promoted through glamorous and exaggerated presentations. Write a letter to the editor, ‘New Indian Express’ about the negative influence that such advertisements have on the minds of the people. You are Radha/Ramesh of Mayur Vihar, Lucknow.ORYou are Chetan Sharma, a commerce graduate from Delhi University. You are seeking for a suitable job. You came across an advertisement in ‘The Times of India’, inviting young and dynamic fresh graduates as sales assistants in a reputed company. Apply for the said job to Box No. 8365, C/o The Times of India, New Delhi.
  11. An old man in your neighbourhood was bitten by a stray dog. This incident and newspaper reports on this issue have made you think of this problem. As Vishnu, write an article in 150-200 words for a popular magazine on the menace of stray dogs and suggest ways to overcome the problem.ORIncessant rain has caused irrecoverable damage in your area. As an active participant in the flood relief programme, write a report in 125-150 words on the different flood relief measures carried out. You are Krishan/Krishna.
  12. Attempt ANY FIVE out of the six questions given below, in 30-40 words each. (2×5=10)
    1. What is the “sadness” that the poet refers to in the poem? (Keeping Quiet)
    2. How does pall of despondence fall over our dark spirits? How can it be removed?
    3. ‘She still has bangles on her wrist, but not light in her eyes’. Justify the statement.
    4. How do the ragpickers help their families?
    5. Why did the peddler sign himself as Captain von Stahle?
    6. How did Shukla convince Gandhiji to come to Champaran?
  13. Attempt ANY TWO out of the three questions given below in 30-40 words each. (2×2=4 )
    1. Why did the General overlook the matter of the enemy soldier?
    2. How did Charley reach the third level of the Grand Central Station?
    3. Do you think that the father in the story was more or less, an alter ego of the author, as far as the child was concerned? Why?
  14. Attempt ANY ONE of the following questions in 120-150 words (1×5=5)
    1. In one’s approach to life, one should be practical and not live in a world of dreams. How is Jansie’s attitude different from that of Sophie’s?
    2. The peddler betrayed the trust of the crofter and was caught in the trap of the world. The temptation to bait should be restricted at all cost. Write a note on “Strength of Character”.
  15. Attempt ANY ONE of the following questions in 120-150 words (1×5=5)
    1. What change took place in Derry when he met Mr Lamb?
    2. What purpose did the question paper and the correction slip serve? How did they help both the criminals and the Governor?

CBSE Class 12 English Core
Sample Paper 01 (2020-21)


Solutions
Section A

    1. (a) They are stored in electrical devices
    2. (b) They will never be permanent memories
    3. (a) Only A and B
    4. (c) One may click hundreds of photos and store them digitally
    5. (c) Photos nowadays can be easily manipulated
    6. (a) They are virtually disposable
    7. (b) They find it difficult to adjust
    8. (c) They are cheaply taken and have lost their originality
    9. (a) Void
    10. (b) Amateur
    11. (b) Chronology
    1. (b) consumer expenditure survey conducted by NSSO
    2. (b) 15%
    3. (c) Method formulated by Dadabhai Naoroji
    4. (d) poverty line derived from expenditure that was adequate to provide 2250 calories per day in both rural and urban areas
    5. (c) Image B
    6. (a) A and C
    7. (b) The current methodology for poverty estimation is based on the recommendations of Tendulkar Committee
    8. (c) Image C
    9. (a) The NPC based its poverty estimate calculation on Dadabhai Nairoji’s methods
    10. (b) National Sample Survey (NSS) data from 1960-61
    11. (d) C, B, A, D
  1. Read the extracts given below and attempt ANY TWO of the three given by answering the questions that follow. (4+4=8)
      1. (a) The ironmaster
      2. (a) Edla Willmansson
      3. (b) Silver spoons
      4. (a) The peddler
      1. (c) the crowd was listening only to Gandhi
      2. (b) dread instilled in the hearts of Indians had begun to lessen
      3. (c) sarcastic
      4. (b) calm acceptance
      1. (a) Susan Hill
      2. (b) Mr. Lamb
      3. (d) Derry
      4. (c) He is afraid of people
  2. Read the extracts given below and attempt ANY ONE of the two given by answering the questions that follow. (1×4=4)
      1. (d) All of these
      2. (a) Hands that shivered out of fear
      3. (c) Chained with responsibilities
      4. (a) In the panel
      1. (a) John Keats
      2. (b) Tales
      3. (d) All of these
      4. (a) Living forever
  3. Attempt ANY EIGHT questions from the ten given below. (1×8=8)
    1. (c) It is the most beautiful language in the world
      Explanation: M. Hamel while delivering the last lesson, told the class that French was the clearest, the most logical and the most beautiful language in the world. He also asked them to guard it as it is the only key to their prison if they are enslaved.
    2. (b) He wanted to examine himself
      Explanation: William was not satisfied even after his instructor told him that he had successfully learned to swim. He was not sure that all the terror had left him. So he went to the Lake Wentworth in New Hampshire, dived off a rock at Triggs Island and swam two miles across the lake to Stamp Act Island. Finally, his terror fled and he swam on.
    3. (c) Fifteen percent
      Explanation: The landlords compelled all tenants to plant three-twentieths or fifteen percent of their holdings with indigo and surrender the entire indigo harvest as rent.
    4. (a) That she would appear back
      Explanation: The poet Kamala Das rendered a commitment to her mother that soon she would come back.
    5. (a) Whales
      Explanation: The poet highlighted the fact that in the period of inactivity, a co-existence would prevail between mankind and nature. He would not harm the animals and would ponder over his actions.
    6. (d) Racism and militarism
      Explanation: In the brief biography of the poet that the poem establishes before itself, it states that Adrienne Rich’s poems echo a strong resistance to racism and militarism.
    7. (c) Jack Finney
      Explanation: The prose was written by the well-known American author Jack Finney.
    8. (c) apathetic and dramatic
      Explanation: Mr.Lamb works actively in spite of his physical disability, loses balance and falls off along with the ladder.
    9. (a) Jackson
      Explanation: Evans was given half an hour to smarten himself. He put on his hat. Mr. Jackson, a prison officer, asked him to take off his hat. Evans did not obey his orders and called the hat as a sign of good luck.
    10. (a) Jo does not accept the ending of the story
      Explanation: The wizard makes Roger Skunk’s smell bad again. Now, Jo does not accept this ending of the story. She wants the wizard to hit mommy. Jo is not convinced by the ending of the story.
  4. Section B
  5. TUTORS AND TUITIONSWell experienced professional, postgraduate in Classical Music and dance, want to teach the art to girl students in the evening between 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., moderate charges, transport facility available. Interested candidates may contact Sneha, Director, Indian Musical Centre, F-46, Sec-9, Rohini, Delhi or Contact 9546xxxxxx.OR
    SUNRISE PUBLIC SCHOOL, GURUGRAM
    NOTICE
    4th April 20XXDRAWING & PAINTING COMPETITIONAll the students of classes VI to XII are hereby informed that the Arts Club of our school is going to organize a drawing & painting competition as per the details given below:

    Date: 10 April 20XX
    Time: 9 AM- 10 AM
    Venue: Cultural Hall
    Theme: ‘Save Earth’

    Interested students may give their names to their class-teacher, latest by 7th April 20XX. For any other detail, contact the undersigned.
    Ridhima
    Secretary, Arts Club

  6. St Anne’s School, Ahmedabad

    The Principal and the governing body of seeking great pride in inviting all students, teachers and staff members to the inauguration of the Literary Club.
    Mr Chetan Bhagat, the well-known novelist, has given his consent to grace the occasion.
    The schedule of the program is as follows:

    Date: 18 March 20XX

    Time: 10:30 am onwards

    Venue: New auditorium

    All the students are expected to be seated in the auditorium by 10:15 am in order to avoid last minute rush.

    OR

    Mrs. and Mr. Krishnamurthi
    solicit your gracious presence
    at the pre-wedding party to celebrate
    their son’s marriage
    on 25th July 20xx
    at 7:30 PM
    at INVITATION BANQUET HALL
    Model Town, Delhi – 110009R.S.V.P.
    Vinit Krishnamurthi
  7. Mayur Vihar
    Lucknow-226018
    24th August, 20XX
    The Editor
    New Indian Express
    Lucknow
    Subject: Negative influence of advertisements
    Sir,
    Through the column of your prestigious newspaper, I wish to draw the attention of the people towards the negative influence of advertisements on their minds. These days advertisements on television are a great source of information. They impart awareness to consumers, which directly benefits the companies. Firms and companies spend a high amount of money to hire famous public figures like actors and cricketers to endorse their products. This cost is added to the price of the products and passed on the customers. These advertisements create an unexpected and hypothetical world for its viewers which binds them to purchase the products. But the matter of concern is that many of these companies showcase useless commodities on television just for monetary gains. In many cases, superstitious beliefs are instilled in the minds of people that they may fall into trouble if the advertiser’s products are not used. They make the advertisements glamorous to draw the attention of the viewers but are actually promoting negative influences, especially in the minds of the younger generation.
    Through your newspaper, I would like to spread awareness among the people to rationalise things and prevent themselves from being blindfolded by misleading advertisements.
    Yours sincerely,
    RadhaORC-40, Ashok Vihar
    New Delhi
    1 April 2019
    The Advertiser
    Box. No. 8365
    C/o The Times of India
    New Delhi
    Sir
    Sub: Application for the post of sales assistant
    In response to your advertisement published in ‘The Times of India’, dated 20 March 2019, stating the requirement of young and fresh graduates as sales assistants, I offer my candidature for the same.
    I have passed my B. Com. (Hons) from S.R.C.C. Delhi, securing 75% marks. I am a zestful and potential student of 21 years. The challenges that the above-mentioned post offers me are big and I am excited to face them under the guidance of your expert team with full enthusiasm for my personal growth and the organisation as well. I enjoy sound health and pleasing personality. I have a reasonably good command over both Hindi and English and possess convincing power and good communication skills which, I hope, make me eligible for this position.
    If selected, I shall certainly prove myself worthy of the post. If you find my profile worthy of it, please feel free to call me at any time suitable to you. I would be glad to come in for an interview.
    Yours truly,
    Chetan SharmaBIO-DATA

    Name Chetan Sharma
    Father’s Name Sh. Mohan Lal Sharma
    Address C-40, Ashok Vihar, New Delhi
    Date of Birth 15 September 1998
    Educational Qualifications (i) B.Com (Hons.) in the year 2019 (75%)
    (ii) CBSE (10+2) Passing year 2016 (83%)
    Salary Expected Rs.15,000pm + perks
    Marital Status Unmarried
    Language Known Hindi, English
  8. The Menace of Stray Dogs
    by Vishnu
    An old man in the neighbourhood has recently been bitten by a stray dog. This incident and newspaper reports on this issue have drawn our concern towards the menace of stray dogs, whose number has been on an unprecedented rise for a long time now.
    The basic issues like this have still not been taken care of despite the fact that our country is developing at a fast pace. There are numerous stray dogs in almost every lane and street. They pose a source of danger to all people, the most vulnerable being children and old people. No action has been taken to tackle the menace of stray dogs despite the repeated complaints to the concerned authorities. The biggest concern is that the stray dogs are not vaccinated and their bite can even prove to be fatal.
    There are several ways plausible to overcome this problem. The municipality should make stray dog shelters so that these animals get a place to live in.
    Regular checks should be carried out on streets and colonies to ensure that dangerous dogs are not wandering around. Before this problem gets grimmer, there is also a need to keep a track on new researches in vaccines and economical modes of sterilisation of canines. It is imperative that the municipal authorities and animal welfare societies work together to address this problem.ORFlood Relief Programme
    by KrishnaNellore, 16th March, 20XX: The volunteers of ‘Heal the World Foundation’ organised a flood relief programme as an initiative to provide immediate help and trauma-relief to the victims of the flood calamity in our area. I actively participated in the programme. The members of our organisation have been working in coordination with the disaster management team to distribute door to door relief material to the victims ever since heavy downpour resulting in heavy floods lashed our area. For providing material relief, our organisation has been raising funds and has also been conducting trauma-relief meditation for the evacuees. A team of 250 volunteers of our organisation including doctors are constantly providing medical aid and food, assisting in rescue operations and clearing the debris. Though the damage caused is irrecoverable, I hope the situation will soon change for the better.
  9. Attempt ANY FIVE out of the six questions given below, in 30-40 words each. (2×5=10)
    1. The poet Pablo Neruda compares to “sadness” with our selfish acts that lead us to enter a rat race to be one up others. We put our heart and soul in trying to achieve our selfish goals but fail to understand ourselves. This leads to all the chaos and confusion in our mind which results in sadness.
    2. Every human being lives a life of ups and downs. Trials and tribulations in one’s life spread the pall of despondency over our dark spirits. We weave a flowery wreath around us which reminds us of our connection with the mother earth. But the failures and disappointments make us disillusioned and we tend to become unhappy, depressed and lonely. We get bogged down to the surroundings that we are unable to understand whether the exercise of finding beauty around us is even worth or not.
      However, a thing of beauty, which surrounds us from all sides, in all shapes and size, elevates our spirits and thus the pall of gloominess can be removed. Beauty lies in the lap of nature that can bring us back to life. There are traps which bind us to the materialistic things and keep us away from eternal happiness. The Earth is full of hatred, greed and negativity. According to the poet, the gloom and sadness caused by this negativity fade away with the positive vibes of the beautiful things that surround us.
    3. Mukesh’s grandmother still wore bangles because her husband was with her, though he was blind. “She has no light in her eyes”, stands for the loss of hope and dreams because of her inability to change her destiny.
    4. The young ragpickers helped their families by picking up garbage. These children worked hard to support their families at such a tender age by selling garbage which was their daily bread. They become partners of their parents in survival. Survival in Seemapuri means rag picking.
    5. The peddler signed himself as Captain von Stahle because Edla had honoured and treated him like a captain despite knowing his real identity and purpose. His signing himself as Captain von Stahle showed that he wanted to retain the dignity and respect accorded to him.
    6. Rajkumar Shukla wanted Gandhiji to take up the cause of the poor peasants in Champaran. Shukla first met Gandhiji at Lucknow, but Gandhiji had other appointments. But Shukla was resolute and followed Gandhiji wherever he went. Gandhiji promised that he had a meeting in Calcutta and would go to Champaran from there. So Shukla went to Calcutta and waited for Gandhiji till he arrived. Gandhiji was impressed by Shukla’s devotion and tenacity. As a result, he decided to go to Champaran with him to solve the problems of the peasants there.
  10. Attempt ANY TWO out of the three questions given below in 30-40 words each. (2 x2=4 )
    1. Dr. Sadao was caught in the dilemma of acting as a nationalist or being a professional doctor. He performed his duty as a nationalist by informing the General about the presence of the American soldier in his house. General Takima was a cruel and selfish man suffering from an ailment, he had an attack and according to Dr. Sadao, he could not survive another one. Apart from Dr. Sadao, no other doctor was capable of performing the operation. So for furthering his selfish needs he overlooked the matter and promised to send his assassins to prevent Dr. Sadao’s arrest for treachery towards the nation. However, he was so self-absorbed, that soon he forgot about it.
    2. Grand Central Station had only two levels. One evening Charley reached the station and then walked down the second level to catch an early train to his home. He strangely happened to notice a doorway down on the second level. He followed the steps and reached the third level.
    3. Jack was a loving father and a deeply concerned husband and constantly worried about his wife expecting their third child. He was quite conscientious when it came to maintaining a balanced family life no matter how weary and tired it made him at the end of the day. His children mattered to him, he took on the mantle of regaling his daughter Joanne with stories. Jack was a good storyteller, very creative and imaginative. He told these stories to Jo for her to go to sleep. His stories had a moral value that taught Jo to be an individual free from outside influences. Jack, in his childhood, also suffered because of skin issues and he stammered too. So, his stories were somewhat his own childhood memories.
  11. Attempt ANY ONE of the following questions in 120-150 words (1×5=5)
    1. Although Sophie and Jansie are classmates and intimate friends, both of them have an altogether different approach towards life. Jansie’s feet are grounded in reality and she tries her best to pinpoint reality. On the contrary, Sophie is a daydreamer who travels on the wings of imagination. Sophie plans to become either a fashion designer or an actress after she passes out from school. Jansie, on the other hand, knows that they have been earmarked to work in the biscuit factory and accepts her fate. Sophie is a loving sister who admires her brother Geoff. She lives in a make-believe world where she befriends sports star Casey and is loved and admired by all. Jansie resigns to her fate and does not indulge in fantasizing like Sophie. Sophie seems immature and fickle-minded. Also, Jansie is a gossipmonger who pokes her nose into other’s affairs. This is why Sophie does not tell her about her meeting with Casey.
    2. “The Rattrap” highlights human predicament/weakness and tendency to fall prey to temptation. The peddler was a tramp and a rattrap seller. He used to wander here and there. One night, he was given shelter by a kind crofter. The crofter even offered him food and reposed his trust in him. However, the peddler betrayed the trust of the crofter by robbing him. When he got lost in the forest, he realised that he himself had been caught in the trap of the world. He even accepted that he was approaching death. Thus, the burden of guilt of theft of money from the crofter was really heavy upon him. The temptation to bait let him befool the ironmaster. However, it was Edla’s compassion and kindness that transformed him and made him a man of good character. Thus, it can be concluded that the temptation to bait should be resisted at any cost. All that matters about a man is the “strength of his character”. A man with a strong character can earn himself not only food and living but also content and happiness in life. However, a man with a weak or bad character tends to fall prey to temptations, which may lead him to inappropriate ways of living life.
  12. Attempt ANY ONE of the following questions in 120-150 words (1×5=5)
    1. Mr Lamb’s meeting with Derry, a complex-stricken lad with a burnt face, became a turning point in Derry’s life. He met Mr. Lamb in the garden who brought a sea change in his viewpoint. Mr Lamb taught Derry to look positively at the world and love and admire everything he saw and heard. He encouraged Derry to make friends with people and not to be bothered by their comments. He reminded Derry that he could live a normal life as he had two legs, two hands, two eyes, two ears and a brain like everyone else had.
      Mr Lamb warned Derry against hating people. He said that the one who hates others gets burned in the fire of hatred. Derry noticed that despite his handicap, Mr Lamb lived a normal independent life. He motivated him to think positively about life, people and things. In the end, Derry promised to return, though his mother forbade him to go there. When Derry reached there, he was deeply shocked to see Lamb killed. Thus, Mr. Lamb removed all negativity from the world of Derry.
    2. Evan was a meticulous planner. The hatching of the escape plan began with the arrival of the German tutor. Then the invigilator and his other friends at the exam centre executed the plan most effectively. The plan was conveyed to Evan through the question paper and the correction slip. The purpose of the photocopied sheet that was superimposed on the question paper and the correction slip was to supply the details of the plan of escape to Evans without uttering a single word. It was also meant to make the authorities believe that the wounded man was McLeery himself. And at that moment, it was effectively used by Evans impersonating as Mc Leery to dodge the authorities.
      However, there is a wise saying ‘iron cuts iron’. Just like that, the way that superimposed question paper and correction slip helped Evans, in the same manner, it also helped the Governor in locating the place where Evans was hiding.
      The six-digit number of the correction slip, i.e. the index number and centre number 313/271, helped the Governor. He put these numbers together and with the help of the Ordnance Survey Map of Oxfordshire reached the hotel where Evans had decided to hide for the day.
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